diary

Alex is testing the waters of the pool while I’m letting myself get overheated sitting on a lawn chair. Approximately three minutes have passed, half of his body is above water, and he is still fidgeting around trying to decide if he’s comfortable with the temperature.

Time lapse.

I get the feeling I’m being cooked alive sitting in a layer of sweat and I know the time has come. I saunter to the pool, picking up speed as I approach the edge, with one thought on my mind;

“Jump.”

When given the chance to vividly experience a moment, wouldn’t we take it?

With each passing moment we are given the option to either jump into something or let it float by. When we jump we are suspended in mid-air and for a moment, we are free. This is a fragile state because what happens next is beyond our control. When we fall we are reminded of our weight once gravity pulls us back down to the ground. We just have to rely on the knowing that something will catch us.

To be vulnerable: is to be alive; susceptible to destruction. And that’s the thing about life; everything must end to begin.

When approached by vulnerability, there are two options of thought: fear or acceptance. We are alive in a time where the fear of discomfort often dims the beauty of chance. Often, I crave the things I desire and not the things I need, comfort becomes an escape, and vulnerability becomes associated with fear. It is easier to be afraid, to stay still, to retreat. Anything worth experiencing has uncertainty of the outcome, but the fear is optional. It is the fear that allows the opportunity of failure to occur. Fear is something created in the mind, and the mind alone. And I just have to remember that.

I have to remember not to fear the fall, but to anticipate the landing. 

asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011
The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’ Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.


asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011
The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’ Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.


asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011
The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’ Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.


asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011
The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’ Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.


asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011
The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’ Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.


asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011
The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’ Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.


asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011
The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’ Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.


asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011
The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’ Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.


asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011
The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’ Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.


asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011
The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’ Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.

asylum-art:

 Huang Yong Ping, Leviathanation, 2011

The exhibition named ‘Tracing The Milky Way’
Huang Yong Ping (born 1954) is a contemporary French visual artist of Chinese origin. Huang’s work combines many media and cultural influence, but is particularly strongly influence by the intellectual abstraction of Dada and by Chinese numerology traditions. Founder of the Xiamen Dada group in China in the 1980s, Huang’s installations have included unorthodox materials such as live snakes and scorpions. Many of Huang’s sculptural works encompass a large scale, some tens of meters in dimension.

(via asylum-art)

wgsn:

Inspired by 3D modelling software glitches, Noa Raviv has designed garments that bring the digital into a physical space.  Classic Greek and Roman sculptures are the starting point and then worked into hi-tech garments.

(via lulawilds)

i know what boys like

“I wonder how biology can explain the physical pain you feel in your chest when all you want to do is be with someone.”
— Dan Howell  (via petrichour)

(via petrichour)

“My mother said I must always be intolerant of ignorance but understanding of illiteracy.”
— Maya Angelou (via purplebuddhaproject)
“For a dreamer, night is the only time of day.”
— The Weeknd (via thedeadrosegarden)

(via likeanoldstory)